Posts

Really Remarkable Hamantaschen Recipes You Need to Try

I love hamantaschen. However, I’m not a huge fan of the traditional version, because I’m not what you’d call a traditional Jew. I’m a new-ish MOT (member of “the Tribe”) and I ate my very first hamantaschen about four years ago. It was so mind-blowing that a couple weeks later, I decided to go all out and make seven different recipes: triple chocolate, mint chocolate chip, pumpkin chai, s’mores, fluffernutter, cookies n’ cream, and of course traditional.

Only one of those recipes really stood out to me though – fluffernutter! It’s a well-known fact that I am a HUGE fan of peanut butter, so this was immediately my new favorite version of hamantaschen. I have now made my fluffernutter recipe every Purim because it’s so gosh darn delicious. It’s chewy, yet a bit crispy, and the filling is to die for.

I am currently a resident of Moishe House Northern Virginia, and we recently hosted a hamantaschen baking and mishloach manot (sending gifts) making program, where we made both the fluffernutter recipe and a super duper simple and delicious traditional recipe. The cookies were a total success and were so much fun to make with friends! Below are both of the recipes we made. I hope you’ll try them out and enjoy them as much as I do!

hamentaschen

Fluffernutter Hamantaschen

Originally by Miriam Pascal

Makes about 40 cookies

Ingredients

  •       ½ cup oil
  •       1 cup peanut butter
  •       ¼ cup light corn syrup
  •       ¾ cup sugar
  •       1 cup light brown sugar
  •       1 teaspoon baking powder
  •       1 teaspoon vanilla
  •       2 eggs
  •       2⅓ cups flour
  •       1 cup peanut butter for the filling
  •       1 cup marshmallow fluff for the filling

Instructions

  • In the bowl of an electric mixer on medium speed, beat together the oil and peanut butter until smooth.
  • Add the corn syrup, sugar and brown sugar and beat until smooth. Mix in the baking powder, vanilla and eggs. Turn the mixer to low and add the flour. Beat until the flour is incorporated.
  • Make the filling by combining the peanut butter and marshmallow fluff until smooth. Set aside.
  • Roll out the dough on a floured surface to about ⅛ inch thickness.
  • Cut out circles of dough and place about a teaspoon of the filling in the center of each one. Fold the corners together to form the hamantaschen shape. (Dough will be delicate, so handle with care.)
  • Place hamantaschen on a greased or parchment paper lined cookie sheet and bake at 350 for 10-12 minutes.
  • Hamantaschen will be soft when they come out of the oven, but will firm up as they cool, so don’t be tempted to overbake them.

luffernuter hamantashen3

Super Duper Easy Hamentaschen Recipe

Originally by Marsha Golden

Makes about 2 dozen

Ingredients

  •       4 eggs
  •       1 cup oil
  •       1 ¼ cups sugar
  •       1 tsp. vanilla
  •       3 tsp. baking powder
  •       ½ tsp. salt
  •       1 tsp. almond extract (optional)
  •       5 ½ cups flour

Instructions

  • Mix all ingredients except flour.
  • Add flour gradually and mix thoroughly. Knead until smooth.
  • With floured hands, take a piece of dough the size of a large walnut, roll it into a ball, and flatten it into a circle with your palms. (Note – You don’t have to do it by hand. If you’re a perfectionist, go ahead and use a rolling pin and a cookie cutter!)
  • Place 1 teaspoon of filling (whatever you want!) into the middle and pinch the edges together to form a triangle.
  • Place hamantaschen on a greased or parchment paper lined cookie sheet and bake at 350 for 15 minutes or until pale gold at the bottom.

hamantashen3

—–

emilyAbout the Author: Emily Mathae lives, breathes, and oozes Jewish community building, through working at The Jewish Federation of Greater Washington and living in Moishe House Northern Virginia. She is NoVA girl through and through and absolutely loves DC and the young Jewish community within it. Outside of Moishe House and The Jewish Federation, you can find her at trivia night, heading to concerts/singing in her car at the top of her lungs, baking delicious treats, crafting, or at events around the DC area.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The views and opinions expressed in this blog and on this website are solely those of the original authors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of the organization GatherDC, the GatherDC staff, the GatherDC board, and/or any/all contributors to this site.

Celebrate Purim, No Hangover Guaranteed

Purim is almost here! Around town, you will usually find hundreds of young adults gathering at local synagogues and bars while dressed up in their favorite costumes, doing lots – and lots – of drinking. On Purim, we’re actually told by the Talmud to drink to the point of not knowing the difference between Haman and Mordecai. But, as much as some may love a stiff Raspberry Hamantini, others may choose not to imbibe for a variety of reasons.

For all those who want more Purim and less alcohol, I present to you a roundup of alternative Purim celebration ideas that provide plenty of festiveness without giving you a headache the next day.

Mishloach Manot

Grab your crew and make these or these creative mishloach manot (Purim gift baskets) for friends or family, or make snack bags for a local non-profit such as Martha’s Table.

purim

Hamantaschen Baking

Host a Hamantaschen bake-off and try unique flavors like gingerbread apple spice, cappuccino, and caramelized onion and goat cheese.

purim

Purim Masks

Discuss a Purim theme such as the “masks we wear” or show off your creative side with a photo shoot at EntryPointDC’s Umasked: A Purim Celebration & Service Project.

mask

Booze-Free Purim Party

Attend a Dry Purim party with Moishe House Columbia Heights and enjoy snacks, games, and some delicious mocktails.

party

Murder Mystery

Need an excuse to dress up and put on a costume? Host a Purim Mystery dinner and assign characters to your guests.

murder mystery

A Very Beatles Musical

Take a road trip to Philly or Brooklyn to witness the interactive musical and sing-a-long A Very Beatles Purim.

the beatles

 

Who knew Purim without the liquor could be so much fun?

Share your #alternativePurim ideas on Instagram and make sure to tag @e_dcjcc and @GatherDC.

 


 

About the Author: Stacy Miller is enjoys entertaining her large Jew crew at her home and is currently the Director of EntryPointDC, the 20s and 30s program of the Edlavitch DCJCC. She represents all things Northern Virginia as the Founder of NOVA Tribe Series and is a former GatherDCGirl of the Year Runner-Up. Most importantly, she wants you know she LOVES this community a-latke.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The views and opinions expressed in this blog and on this website are solely those of the original authors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of the organization GatherDC, the GatherDC staff, the GatherDC board, and/or any/all contributors to this site.

Your DC Purim Guide: 2019/5779

purim

Raise your hand if…

  • You like to party
  • Eat sugary cookies filled with peanut butter/chocolate/raspberry jam
  • Dress in costume when its not Halloween
  • Enjoy libations guilt free
  • Scream really loudly about political figures you despise

Well, you are in luck…

Purim is just around the corner.

Since its been a full year (or more?!) since you last celebrated this glorious holiday, here’s a little refresher of the Purim story: An awful anti-Semitic man wanted to destroy the Jews. He didn’t. We partied.

If you want more of a history refresher, try going to one of the many Megillah-readings around DC (listed below) or watching this brand new investigative podcast, “Haman: A True Crime Story”.

 

There’s also a huge slew of other Purim parties, hamantaschen recipes, and gatherings across the DMV! Oh, and if we missed a Purim event – submit it here or email Allison Friedman.

However you celebrate, we wish you a chag Purim sameach – a happy and joyous Purim!

Sunday, March 10th

Saturday, March 16th

Sunday, March 17th

Monday, March 18th

Tuesday, March 19th

Wednesday, March 20th

Friday, March 22nd

Saturday, March 23rd

Monday, March 25th

hamantschen

Where to Get Hamantaschen

Purim Inspiration

The views and opinions expressed in this blog and on this website are solely those of the original authors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of the organization GatherDC, the GatherDC staff, the GatherDC board, and/or any/all contributors to this site.

HAPPY PURIM YA’LL!!!!!

Confused? Good. This was a joke in honor of the holiday of Purim, which begins tonight, February 28th. Purim is known as the day we eat triangle shaped cookies (hamentashen) and read the story of Esther in the megillah out loud. It’s also known as a day we turn everything upside down by wearing costumes and getting drunk (if you so choose) – it’s basically April Fools meets Halloween.

But, Purim’s not just another excuse to dress up and party – there’s actually a deep spiritual message behind the holiday. Throughout the year, we delude ourselves into thinking that we control our surroundings and that we know everything. Purim is a day to let go of that control and give in to the unknown. To specifically lose control.

There’s a deep fear in acknowledging and sitting with uncertainty. But, it can also be liberating to appreciate the limits of what we can perceive or know. Purim is about finding hope in the most unexpected places by giving in to surprise and embracing how quickly things can turn around.

If you’re looking for ways to celebrate Purim this year, there are lots of incredible opportunities here in DC – check them out HERE!

And if you’re looking for more hilarious spoof articles to brighten up your Wednesday, look no further:

 

The GatherDC Staff

Rachel #1, Rachel #2, Allie, Jackie, Mollie, Julie, and Aaron

Rogue Rabbi to host alternative Purim experience in a Synagogue

Rabbi Aaron Potek, GatherDC’s infamous rabbi and provocateur, is pushing the envelope yet again.

Rabbi Aaron Potek

Potek announced earlier this week that he will be hosting an alternative Purim experience this Wednesday night…in a synagogue.

It’s a risky move for someone who works with Jewish 20s and 30s, many of whom don’t connect to synagogues. But Potek thinks the idea just might be crazy enough to work.

“We were originally looking to host this in an abandoned warehouse or something hipster like that,” he said. “But then we realized that synagogues were just as abandoned and even more unexpected. I mean, honestly, where’s the last place you’d want to celebrate Purim?”

Some Jewish leaders are calling this the most innovative program to happen in DC in years. “You look at the landscape here – Hannukah Happy Hours, Shabbat Happy Hours, Happy Hours for Immigrants’ Rights, or even just generic monthly Happy Hours… it’s literally all Happy Hours,” said Mordy Goldstone, head of OJO, an outdated Jewish organization. “It takes real vision and out-of-the-box thinking to come up with something as genius as this.”

But others, specifically from the religious community, are less enthusiastic. Observant Jews typically celebrate Purim in a bar or at a festive party – eating and drinking in complete and total excess. Potek’s new idea is a serious departure from tradition.

“God clearly thinks Purim must be celebrated in a bar,” said Avi Frumstein a religious Jew and apparently God’s spokesman. (God did not respond to multiple requests for comment.)

“Rabbi Potek has crossed a line here and his ordination should be revoked,” continued Frumstein. When pressed on whether that response was perhaps an overreaction, Frumstein doubled down. “My seemingly random, zealous passion on this insignificant, meaningless issue is actually just my way of overcompensating for a lack of passion about my insignificant, meaningless life.”

Potek seems to have embraced the controversy behind his initiative.

“I guess I am trying to challenge what it means to be religious, which is not only about drinking and partying,” he said. “You can be religious in a synagogue, too.”

When asked why she planned to attend the alternative Purim experience in a synagogue this year, Pam Scherzer said it sounded “exotic.” She elaborated, “I’m into alternative spirituality – for example, my friends and I all do yoga, which is basically like a workout class, but with a smack of Sanskrit. But I’m even more into telling people that I’m into alternative spirituality. So I’m looking forward to telling people that I went to this so I can sound cool and different without actually being too different because I’m uncomfortable with difference.”

So what can people expect at the event itself?

“No costumes, no groggers, no hamantaschen,” Potek said. “Those are all distractions from a holiday that’s meant for adults. We’re going to read from the scroll of Esther – about an ostentatious, vindictive, womanizing ruler – and see if we can find any modern-day parallels.”

That goal may be overly ambitious for a population that seems perfectly content with an un-compelling, childish, kitschy Judaism. But maybe, just maybe, a few people will move past the conversation about the location of the event and actually engage with the content of the holiday.

 

The views and opinions expressed in this blog and on this website are not even those of the original author. They are totally made up – Happy Purim!

Announcement: Happy Hours to be called All-Emotions Hours

“Happier” times. What about the angry or surprised times?

In response to feedback from our community, we will be changing the name of our monthly happy hours to “all-emotions hours.” We regret our role in reinforcing systemic emotional inequalities by perpetuating the happiness hegemony, and we hope this change will encourage people of all emotions to feel more comfortable in our spaces.

Our happy hours were intended to be open, inclusive spaces where people of all emotions could be hit on by creepy men. Names matter, and the name “Happy Hour” clearly privileges happiness over other feelings like sadness, fear, anger, and disgust. When people leave feeling disgusted, we want them to know that’s totally OK.

We were surprised to learn that there are more than five emotions, a misconception that persists due to the constant exclusion of lesser-known emotions in movies like Pixar’s “Inside Out.” We were then surprised – again – to learn that “surprise” itself is one of those lesser-known emotions. These emotions have been so marginalized in our society that we didn’t even recognize it within ourselves. Clearly, then, we weren’t honoring it within others.

Sure enough, looking through photos from our past happy hours, we realized that not a single other emotion besides happiness was represented; we’re ashamed and embarrassed that every single photo featured people who were smiling or laughing. 

Moving forward, we will make sure we photograph people experiencing the full range of human emotions.

Originally, we thought about highlighting a different, underrepresented emotion each month – e.g. September’s Sad Hour or April’s Angry Hour. But then it was pointed out to us that this still would be favoring one emotion over all the others. To truly break the happiness hierarchy, we needed to make space for all emotions at every hour.

So long Pharrell.

We are also becoming increasingly sensitive to the role of our implicit biases in all of this. One additional change that will take effect immediately will be changing the music that is played. We will never again play “Happy” by Pharrell Williams, “Can’t Stop the Feeling” by Justin Timberlake, nor any song from Uncle Kracker’s album “Happy Hour,” even though “Smile” is a pretty great song and – be honest – you haven’t heard it in a while and kind of want to hear it again.

We have also set up monthly “open meetings” to help us better reach out to all emotions, though so far only the emotions of “pissed,” “righteously indignant,” “bored” and “gassy” have been represented. And if you’re thinking, like we were thinking, that “gassy” isn’t an emotion, then maybe you should think about whether you really want to be policing what is and is not a legitimate emotion – a lesson we had to learn the hard way.

To reiterate – no one emotion is better than any other emotion. We may not validate your parking, but we validate whatever emotion you’re feeling, even if it’s anger at our not having validated your parking. Also, to reiterate – we don’t validate parking.

We acknowledge that some may feel that all of this change is happening too fast, while others may feel that we’re not going far enough. (It’s been pointed out that “all-emotions hour” still privileges the hour over other units of time.) Still, we hope this is a step in the right direction, and we appreciate your patience as we grow together through this learning experience.

See you at next month’s all-emotions hour!

 

 

The views and opinions expressed in this blog and on this website are not even those of the original author. They are totally made up – Happy Purim!

How to Celebrate the Spirit of Purim Across DC!

Jewish-holiday-wise, Purim is sneaky. It creeps up in mid-February or March every year, just as we’re reeling from our second try at New Year’s resolutions, and are already thinking about Passover. (Mark your calendars – Purim starts on Wednesday night, February 28th!)

For those who need a little refresher as to what this holiday is all about – I’ve got you covered. Purim celebrates the story of the Book of Esther, when the Jews were saved from Haman’s evil plot. You may have heard it called  “The Jewish Halloween” because of the awesome costumes worn to celebrate the holiday. It’s also the holiday when we shake rice-filled water bottles and make triangular hamentaschen cookies  (plot twist: fill them with nutella?).

There are four core mitzvot (commandments) for celebrating Purim:

  • Reading the Book of Esther
  • Sending Mishloach Manot (snack goodie bags for neighbors and friends)
  • Eating a festive meal (with plenty of adult beverages for those who choose to partake)
  • Giving gifts to the poor (Matanot Le’evyonim). This mitzvah is our expression of gratitude for when Queen Esther and her uncle Mordechai saved the Jews from being killed.

In my view, the last I listed – Matanot Le’evyonim, or gifts to the poor – is rarely emphasized in our general understanding of Purim. The Purim spirit is one of fun, filled with costumes, community parties, delicious Hamentaschen cookies, and general positivity and merriment. This year, I challenge us to put a bit more focus into the Matanot Le’evyonim mitzvah – to not just satisfy the mitzvah by giving to charity, but to truly carry over the positive spirit of joy and celebration that is Purim into acts of service.

These four mitzvot are all part of the Purim holiday! Here’s how to participate in all four – check out these happenings across DC to bring you closer to the Purim spirit!

 

Megillah: Reading of the Book of Esther

Listen to the Megillat Esther (the book of Esther) read aloud. When you add in maracas, rice-filled water bottles, plastic “noisemakers” from Party City, and enthusiastic booing for good measure – fulfilling this mitzvah is much more fun than it sounds.

You can hear the megillah reading at:

 

Mishloach Manot: Make gift bags for friends, family, and neighbors

If you want to send mishloach manot (gifts of food), make sure to include hamentaschen! (This may be controversial, but the best flavor is definitely poppyseed.) Get a head start on these gift bags with:

Spread the joy of hamentaschen to all: consider donating hamentaschen you bake to local senior centers like Congregation Etz Hayim did this past weekend at the Culpepper Garden senior living facility in Arlington.

 

Seudat Purim: Have a festive meal

This is the one mitzvah that everyone seems to remember as “it’s a mitzvah to get drunk on Purim!” Although this injunction does tell Jews to “drink until you don’t know the difference between Haman and Mordechai” – what it is saying, on a deeper level, is to find a way to look beyond our rational minds, and tap into our deepest, faith-based self – and, of course, to have lots of fun! However, for those of us who aren’t big into drinking – you can still celebrate this mitzvah with a delicious meal (filled with foods symbolic of the Purim story), and by letting go of stress and totally relaxing into the spirit of the holiday.

Celebrate this fun mitzvah by:

Consider providing a seudah or feast for others – collect cans or non-perishable food at your Purim meal for a local food pantry! See what places like So Others May Eat (SOME) need. In the truest millenial fashion, consider having guests purchase items in need off of Miriam’s Kitchen’s Amazon Wishlist.

Photo courtesy of The Jewish Federation

Matanot Le’evyonim: Giving back to those in need

Incorporating the spirit of service into the other Purim mitzvot can also help in bringing the spirit of Purim joy to the mitzvah of Matanot Le’evyonim!  This Purim mitzvah invites us to help at least two people and to provide enough food for a full meal. Go bigger than our typical mitzvah to give tzedakah, or charity, and bring the joyous Purim spirit to this mitzvah!

There are so many ways to infuse Purim joy into service work. Some may choose to give traditional tzedakah gifts, but others may prefer to give their time, energy, and skills. Read this article for more ways to give back across DC.

However you celebrate, wishing you a chag Purim sameach – a happy and joyous Purim!

 

 

 

 

About the Author: Shira Cohen is a part of our “Gather the Bloggers” cohort of talented writers who share their thoughts and insights about DC Jewish life with you! When not writing about volunteer opportunities in DC, she works in student life and disability services at a local law school. Originally from Charleston, SC, Shira loves DC Library $1 book sales and District Taco.

 

 

The views and opinions expressed in this blog and on this website are solely those of the original authors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of the organization GatherDC, the GatherDC staff, the GatherDC board, and/or any/all contributors to this site.