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Nosh Hashanah: DC’s Best Spots for Your Jewish New Year Feast

The Jewish New Year is upon us, and that means a few things.

First, it’s a time for self-reflection. Just like that scene in “Mulan” – you know the one.

Second, it’s a time to turn that self-reflection into a “resolution.” For most of us this will likely be a “resolut-”, which will be broken before we finish saying the word resolution.

Third, and perhaps most importantly, it’s time for some super special food.

Here at GatherDC, we think about food a lot. Almost as much as we think about coffee. So we’ve decided to do you all a favor and provide you with a guide to the very best in DC’s high holiday food specials. You’re welcome.

DESSERT

Alex Levin’s Rosh Hashanah Pop-Up Bake Shop

Back by popular demand, Alex Levin and his phenomenal team at Schlow Restaurant Group are providing the District with all the best sweet treats for your high holiday needs. These include, but are not limited to, traditional honey challah, handmade pies, apple butter honey cake, hazelnut chocolate crunch rugelach, and artisanal candies. You know what they say about artisanal candies.

View the full mouth-watering menu here and place your orders here.

dessert

Alex Levin’s Rosh Hashanah Bakeshop

 

Sunflower Bakery

Sunflower Bakery is a Bethesda favorite, and their Rosh Hashanah menu is baked goods heaven! From the traditional honey cake loaves and mini apple and honey cupcakes to the creative pies, tortes, and chutneys, Sunflower Bakery has dozens of vegan, gluten free, and nut free options to make you the star of all your dinners and break-fasts!

You can place an order by TODAY, September 5th, for pick-up on September 9th pretty much anywhere in the DMV region, or you can stop by their bakery anytime throughout the high holiday season to grab some last-minute goodies.

Plus, this bakery is an inclusive space that employs young adults with learning differences to prepare them for future employment in food industries. Ask them about this when you stop by to pick up your cupcakes!

CATERING

Char Bar

Char Bar is a staple in the DC kosher food scene, and their high holiday catering menu is no exception. Highly customizable and insanely delicious (homemade brisket or apricot glazed chicken? Matzo ball or butternut squash soup?), this package serves 10-12 people and is a verified feast worthy of ringing in 5779!

Check out the order form here.

Hill Country BBQ Brisket

Your favorite Texas-themed-DC-BBQ-hotspot is serving up some tender, juicy, delicious brisket this Rosh Hashanah. Grab some grub, get some drinks, and sing some karaoke. 5779 is the year of no regrets.

DINE-IN

Joe’s Stone Crab Rosh Hashanah Menu

We know, this seems like a disconnect. Joe’s Stone Crab has a Rosh Hashanah menu? Yes, you read that correctly. This DC institution is offering a special multi-course menu just for the Jewish New Year. There are classic faves like gefilte fish, matzo ball soup, brisket, and couscous – the rice so nice they named it twice.

View their entirely delectable menu here.

Mon Ami Gabi

Joignez-vous à votre bistro français préféré pour un repas multi-cours sur le thème du nouvel an juif. Challah aux pommes et au miel, poisson de gefilte fait maison, foie haché, soupe de boule de matzo, etc. Traduction française non incluse.

**Translation: Join your favorite french bistro for a special Jewish New Year themed multi-course meal. Challah with apples and honey, homemade gefilte fish, chopped liver, matzo ball soup, and more. French translation not included.

Check out the full menu here.

challah

Alex Levin’s Rosh Hashanah Bakeshop

Summer House

Summer’s not over yet! Summer House Santa Monica is keeping our spirits sunny and warm by offering an extra sweet Rosh Hashanah dinner menu complete with challah with apples and honey, brisket, matzo ball soup, and gefilte fish. It even comes with a Jewish mother who keeps pressuring you to eat more and incessantly asks when you’re getting married.

Teddy and the Bully Bar

Did you know Teddy Roosevelt was the first U.S. President to appoint a Jewish cabinet member? Celebrate his legacy of inclusion and head on down to Teddy and the Bully Bar on September 9th and 10th for a prix fixe, three-course meal incorporating traditional foods like apples with honey, house-made gefilte fish, and challah bread, along with modern twist dishes like handmade potato and butternut squash latkes, golden and red beet tzimmies, and more!

Delicious menu can be found here. Big stick not included.

Dino’s Grotto

A local artisan Italian restaurant may not have been your first thought when deciding where to ring in the Jewish New Year, but if you haven’t seen their high holiday menus, you better think again.

With menus for Rosh Hashanah, Kol Nidre, and breaking the fast, Dino’s Grotto is shaping up for a high holidays trifecta! With items like latkes with mascarpone and apple-dried compote, noodle kugel, duck fat matzo ball soup, and of course, round challah and honey roasted apples, you surely won’t go hungry this season.

brisket

Photo by Dino’s Grotto

 

Is your favorite restaurant doing something special for the holidays that you don’t see on here? Email info@gatherdc.org with why you think it should be featured, and we’ll add it to this post!

 

About the Authors

Rachel Nieves

As GatherDC’s Community Coordinator, Rachel helps connect those new or new(ish) to DC and help them feel at home. She loves meeting new people, and connecting them with each other to help build thriving friendships. When she’s not in the GatherDC office or grabbing coffee with community members, you can find her dancing (more like flailing) to the nearest live cover band, admiring dogs that aren’t hers in Meridian Hill Park, watching reality television, and hanging out and laughing with her friends.

 

Julie Thompson

Julie helps keep GatherDC’s wheels turning behind the scenes as the Office Manager. When Julie isn’t at the GatherDC office, she’s probably out with friends trying a new restaurant across DC, planning her next big trip to explore a new corner of the world, or snuggled in with a good book and her rescue cat, Chloe.

 

 

 

The views and opinions expressed in this blog and on this website are solely those of the original authors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of the organization GatherDC, the GatherDC staff, the GatherDC board, and/or any/all contributors to this site.

Spotted in Jewish DC: Alex Levin’s Rosh Hashanah Pop-Up Bakeshop!

We’ve smelled, er spotted, something delicious baking in Jewish DC. It’s a pop-up bakeshop for Rosh Hashanah complete with things like hazelnut chocolate rugelach, caramelized apple pie, whipped ricotta cheesecake, honey challah with raisins.

Your stomach grumbling yet?

The man behind the pastries, Chef Alex Levin, took a quick break from the kitchen to chat with us about the best things to order from this bakeshop, his New Year resolutions, and where he eats when he’s not working.

P.S. GatherDC-ers can get their hands on these baked goods for 10% off with code GatherDC at checkout.

chef levin

Allie: What number pop-up bakeshop is this for you?

Chef Alex: This is the 3rd Annual Rosh Hashanah Pop-Up Bakeshop. Each year, the interest and popularity of this grows exponentially. We have increased our production potential to make sure we have challah and desserts for everyone who is interested. I’ve also done pop-ups in the past for Thanksgiving and other holidays. This year, we’re considering extending the pop-up to offer some items for Yom Kippur too. Stay tuned!

Allie: What item(s) are you most excited about whipping up for the public to nosh on?

Chef Alex: When the Rosh Hashanah meal starts off with an fabulous challah, the year begins on a high note. My challah recipe started with my beloved grandmother. Then, it got a “pastry chef” upgrade after I learned how to make bread professionally. The bread is rich in flavor with a dark, golden crust. We use honey, wheat flour, raisins for those who wish, and shape the bread in the traditional circle.

I love rugelach.  So does everyone else! We have the very popular Hazelnut Chocolate Crunch Rugelach available.

We also organized “The Ultimate Rosh Hashanah Spread” which gives you one of everything. 

challah

Allie: How can GatherDC readers can their hands on these goodies?

Chef Alex: Click here or click on the link in my Instagram profile @chefalexlevin and enter promo code GatherDC for 10% off your order. You can have everything delivered to your home or pickup your order in person from a couple of central locations in the city. If you have any special requests,or if price is an issue for anyone, reach out to me on Instagram. I will make it work for you.

Allie: What is your favorite way to celebrate the Jewish New Year?

Chef Alex: I love spending the holiday with my family. Right after the last delivery is made from the pop-up, I hop on a quick flight to New York to spend two days with them. My parents host a large gathering on the second day of Rosh Hashanah for lunch and I usually have the privilege of baking challah and desserts for that.

Allie: Do you have any personal resolutions for the Jewish New Year?

Chef Alex: To host Shabbat dinners on a regular basis. 

Allie: What’s your favorite restaurant in DC…that you don’t work at/for?

Chef Alex: Little Serow. When you walk in the front door, the team gives the warmest greeting. And of course the food is delicious – full of heat, bright flavors, and always changing.

Allie: Do you have any other plans to curate Jewish holiday related menus throughout the year?

Chef Alex: For Hanukkah, I have a big party planned at Casolare Ristorante + Bar for all of the synagogues in the city to come together and celebrate the holiday with all the staples (e.g. crispy latkes, sufganiyot). Alta Strada will host a Hanukkah dinner that Michael Schlow, Matt Adler, and I will cook for. For Passover, we will have a Passover Seder Feast at Riggsby and Alta Strada. Also, anyone that ever wants a special holiday meal in their home or a shabbat dinner in their home, just reach out to me.

Allie: I heard you traveled to Israel this year, how did that trip inspire you and your role as a chef in the city?

Chef Alex: The trip was called REALITY Taste and organized by the Schusterman Foundation. While it’s impossible to properly answer this question in any short way, what I can say is that the trip imparted a warrior-level need to impart the value of tikkun olam (repairing the world) into all of my activities as a human being, and my duty as a leader in the community. So, this pop-up bakeshop – in this context – is an opportunity to bring a delicious and sweet Jewish New Year to anyone that is interested. 

dessert

Allie: What are you most excited for in the year ahead?

Chef Alex: This past year has been a hugely foundational moment of time. I just moved into a new condo in Bloomingdale, have been lucky to become super close with family and friends and have had the exciting pleasure of becoming an uncle. This year I am looking forward to settling down even more, getting involved in the board of a nonprofit here in the city and of course baking my head off for everyone that I can find!

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challahYou can place an order from Chef Alex Levin’s Rosh Hashanah Pop-Up Bakeshop here. Delivery and pickup options available on Saturday, 9/8 and Sunday, 9/9. For questions, email alevin@schlowrg.com.

*Use promo code GatherDC for 10% off.*

 

 

 

 

 

 


The views and opinions expressed in this blog and on this website are solely those of the original authors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of the organization GatherDC, the GatherDC staff, the GatherDC board, and/or any/all contributors to this site.

DC High Holiday Guide 2018!

5779 high holiday guide

High holiday time is one of our top 4 favorite seasons of the year here at GatherDC. And guess what…it’s back!

DC kills it every year when it comes to having fun ways to ring in the Jewish New Year. Don’t believe us? Check out the list below. Whether you’re looking for a Reform Erev Rosh Hashanah service, a Conservative Second Day Rosh Hashanah service, or a an alternative Kol Nidre experience, this list has it. (Don’t see anything you like? Email us. Let’s talk.)

  1. First, explore the list of events below that are happening across the DC-area.
  2. Then, email us at info@gatherdc.org if you’re not sure which event is right for you, and/or want a friendly face to go with.
  3. Finally, watch this video with the sound ON.

Happy New Year from GatherDC! from Allison Friedman on Vimeo.

 

Boom. Done. You’re welcome.

Actually, HOLD UP. Before you dive in this list of fun, here’s a few important things to note:

a) High holiday tickets sell out quickly, so make your Jewish New Year plans early. Also, The EDCJCC has discounted high holiday tickets for young professionals here.

b) Don’t see your event high holiday event listed? Know of a Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur service that should be on here? Submit your Jewish New Year event here.

c) When a high holiday service/event is crossed out, it’s sold out.

d) Need to exchange your ticket? Want to go to a service that is sold out? Use our handy-dandy Jewish High Holiday ticket exchange!

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HIGH HOLIDAY PREP

Saturday, September 1st

Tuesday, September 4th – Wednesday, October 3rd

Wednesday, September 5th

Thursday, September 6th

Saturday, September 8th

Saturday, September 8th – Sunday, September 9th

Sunday, September 9th

Thursday, September 13th 

Saturday, September 15th

Sunday, September 16th 

Monday, September 17th 

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ROSH HASHANAH: September 9th – 11th

Sunday, September 9th (Erev Rosh Hashanah)

Monday, September 10th (Rosh Hashanah, Day 1)

Tuesday, September 11th (Rosh Hashanah, Day 2)

NOTE: If you need to exchange your Rosh Hashanah service ticket – or want a ticket to a sold out service, use our High Holiday Ticket Exchange here.

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YOM KIPPUR: September 18th – 19th

Tuesday, September 18th (Kol Nidre)

Wednesday, September 19th (Yom Kippur Day)

Wednesday, September 19th (Neilah/Break Fast)

NOTE: If you need to exchange your Yom Kippur service ticket – or want a ticket to a sold out service, use our High Holiday Ticket Exchange here.

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SUKKOT: September 23rd – 30th

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SIMCHAT TORAH: October 1st – 2nd

Monday, October 1st – Tuesday, October 2nd (Simchat Torah)

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HIGH HOLIDAY INSPIRATION

Elul

Rosh Hashanah

Yom Kippur

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RECIPES

 

 

The High Holiday Guide on this web page will keep you informed of activities and services you can attend in the Washington, DC area. Scroll through for all events around the High Holidays in Greater Washington including Erev Rosh Hashanah, Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Kol Nidre, Break the Fast, Sukkot, Simchat Torah, high holiday recipes, high holiday inspiration, and more. For questions or assistance, please contact us at info@gatherdc.orgGatherDC welcomes the participation of interfaith ​individuals, and people of all abilities, backgrounds, gender identities and sexual orientations. GatherDC ​fosters inclusive communities​​​ and strive​s​ to accommodate all needs whenever possible. If you require special accommodations, please contact us​ in advance of the event​ at (202) 656-0743, and we will make every effort to meet your needs.

 

2015/5776 High Holiday Guide

This is the guide from 2015! Be sure to check out the one from 2017 here.

The coconut provides a nutritious source (2)

Erev Rosh Hashana—Sunday, September 13

Rosh Hashana (1st Day)—Monday, September 14

Rosh Hashana (2nd Day)—Tuesday, September 15

Kol Nidre—Tuesday, September 22

Yom Kippur—Wednesday, September 23

Other Resources:

  • High Holiday ticket exchange! Have high holiday tickets that you are not using? Enter them here and check out what tickets are available here!
  • EntryPointDC High Holiday Tickets – Many of the congregations in the area sell their tickets through EntryPointDC, get your tickets today!
  • 10Q – 10 Days. 10 Questions.
  • Jewels of Elul – Daily inspiration every day of the Jewish month of Rosh Hashanah (Elul)
  • Educational materials – from AJWS
  • My Bubby – offering a 20% discount off their honey card of the month. Just enter the code “sweetrosh” upon checkout by August 31.
  • JSSA – Support JSSA volunteers as they deliver baskets of traditional holiday items and food to Jewish families and individuals who are unable to afford these items on their own.
  • Jewish Food Experience – Top 10 Recipes for a Scrumptious Year

Rosh Hashanah Event for Jewish US Troops in Afghanistan

The Chesed Project is hosting an event to donate food items and make holiday cards for US troops stationed in Afghanistan over Rosh Hashanah.  We did a similar event this past Chanukah and it was so successful, so for our final event, we wanted to support the troops again!

We are asking you to bring something from the following list of donations (cash is also welcome and checks can be made to Kosher Troops — donations are tax deductible):

  • Healthy snacks with a reliable hechsher (granola bars, trail mix, dried fruit).
  • Instant coffee or tea with a reliable hechsher.  These guys are adults and appreciate more adult creature comforts (although no alcohol is allowed).
  • Rosh Hashana related candy (not sure if this exists, but it if does, how excited will our Jewish servicemen/women be?!)
  • Construction paper, markers/crayons, scissors, glue, glitter — things to make some decorations and also cards for the soldiers. We’ll have some, but if you have extra supplies you’d like to donate, they are welcomed.

The event will be THIS SUNDAY, August 12, from 2-5pm, in the basement party room at 2000 N St NW (The Flats).

This will also be Samantha’s last Chesed Project event, before going to Israel, so we hope you’ll be there to help make it successful. Contact Samantha with any questions at daydreambeliever82 at gmail dot com.

……………..

To learn more about Chesed Project, see these past GTJ posts:

How to Choose a High Holidays Venue

So, moving to D.C. this time of year definitely is an interesting experience. It’s the beginning of the new academic year, the end of summer internships, and most of all, the beginning of the high holidays. Luckily, D.C.’s Jewish community provides all sorts of venues for partying like it’s 5772. How you figure out where to go for services when you’re brand new is a whole other debacle, though. And it could inspire you to find the right shul to attend for holidays, the rest of the year, and even the rest of your time in D.C.

Finding the right place to gather your thoughts and connect with God and others depends largely on what you want to get out of the shul-going experience. The month of Elul, a rather reflective month in the Jewish calendar year, gives way to that sort of self-discovery and decision-making for personal growth.

Decide if you want to hear music, how much singing you feel comfortable with, and how much English and/or Hebrew you want your service to include. Would you prefer a large congregation, or a smaller, more intimate one?

For example, Tikkun Leil Shabbat incorporates music and singing into its service as a focus, and service is accompanied by acoustic guitar and percussion. The services are egalitarian as well. TLS meets on Friday night once every three weeks, but the synagogue offers “Shabbat to go” supplies so you can celebrate even if there isn’t a meeting.

The Washington Hebrew Congregation has cantors, a full choir, and a live instrumental band to give congregants a more musical service for Shabbat services. “Contemporary” services are also held about once a month by Rabbi Fabricant or Rabbi Miller to incorporate folk and contemporary guitar music to lead the congregation.

Does it matter to you whether there’s a mechitzah or not? Would female involvement in the service pique your interest? There’s a shul in D.C. to fulfill every one of these options, and egalitarianism has become a hot topic to make synagogues a little more varied. DC Minyan in Dupont, while it has female involvement, still has separate seating without a mechitzah. Kesher Israel in Georgetown’s separated seating is a bit more prominent, in that the women’s section is a balcony above the men’s services.

At Rosh Pina, a woman leads Kabbalat Shabbat services for Friday night, while the men take the lead on mincha and ma’ariv.  On Shabbos morning, men lead shacharit and musaf, and a woman leads pesukei d’zimra. Both women and men receive aliyot and lein from the Torah. There is still a mechitzah at Rosh Pina to separate seating.

Many synagogues, while trying to bring women into the services more, are still finding the balance between egalitarian and halachically-correct. Trying out different services may prove to be a good experiment to find out where your comfort level is on the issue.

And you’ll need to decide if you prefer a more open format for services, or a traditional one, like the Chabad in Dupont. Keep in mind, that Orthodox services tend to go long on holidays, so if you’re not one to sit and pray from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., a shorter service might be more ideal.

Rachel Bernstein is a new Gather the Jews columnist who will be writing a weekly post about her experiences as a newcomer to the DC Jewish scene.

So, so knead-y

Holiday appropriate deliciousness

Jewish holidays are the perfect springboard off of which to experiment with new recipes. I’ve been at a loss these last few weeks with no event to guide my recipe selection, so I was excited that I could navigate this week’s post with an eye toward the Jewish new year. I wanted to make something that included Rosh Hashanah staples and was ecstatic that Google led me to a recipe for round apple challah, which you can check out here.

I had the pleasure of working with two sous chefs on this recipe, which turned out to be a smart move since the directions were a bit complex. My frequent query of “can you repeat that?” likely irritated my helpers, so I want to thank them for being such troopers (and for being such vigilant time keepers!). I must be getting bolder because I took some artistic liberty with this recipe. First, I substituted sugar with 1/2 cup of honey to maintain the integrity of the holiday. Second, I glazed the challah with eggs 5 minutes before taking it out of the oven to achieve a glossy coating. And finally, I used a wine bottle wrapped in saran wrap in lieu of a rolling pin. Not really artistic liberty, but an example of resourcefulness I wanted to share.

Improvising...

So how does the whole experience rank? On a scale of 1 to 5, with 1 being “bad” and 5 being “good”:

Prep time: 1

This recipe took four hours (mostly prep time), which probably would have been less of an issue if I hadn’t starting baking at 8:30 PM.  It was a long night, but some Chinese food and a movie helped pass the time.

Overall ease: 2

The unbelievable time and attention this challah demanded was somewhat balanced by the sheer fun of baking it. My friends and I got to crack, whisk, peel, and best of all, knead! Unlike brisket, which required minimal effort and a long cook time, challah asks a lot of its baker, which makes the final product that much more meaningful.

Cook time: 3

Once the dough was ready, cook time was only 1 hour.

Cost: 5

The only things I had to purchase for this recipe were yeast and bread flour, which only came to a few dollars. Luckily one of my helpers had picked apples the prior weekend, so we used her tart and delicious apples at no cost.

Taste: 5

The tasting audience was unanimous that this challah was amazing. It was moist, chewy, and sweet. I was a bit skeptical about how the chunks of apple would turn out, but they provided some great tartness! The top glazed layer of sugar added a little crunch. It even looked pretty, which we all know just enhances the taste.

Apple Challah

  • 2 envelopes instant yeast
  • 5 cups  bread flour
  • 1 cup warm water
  • 3 large eggs
  • 1/3 cup vegetable oil, plus extra for oiling the pan and for topping
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons table salt
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar, plus extra for sprinkling OR 1/2 cup of honey
  • 3 large or about 4 medium baking apples, preferably Braeburns

Mixing the yeast slurry
In a large bowl, whisk together the yeast and 1 cup (125 grams/3.8 ounces) of the flour, then whisk in the warm water until smooth. Let the slurry stand uncovered for 10 to 20 minutes, or until it begins to ferment and puff up slightly.

Mixing the dough
Whisk the eggs, oil, salt, and sugar into the puffed yeast slurry until the eggs are well incorporated and the salt and sugar have dissolved. With your hands or a wooden spoon, stir in the remaining 4 cups (550 grams/20 ounces) flour all at once. When the mixture is a shaggy ball, scrape it out onto your work surface and knead it until it is smooth and firm, no more than 10 minutes. (Soak your mixing bowl in hot water now to clean it and warm it for fermenting the dough.) If the dough is too firm to knead easily, add a tablespoon or two of water to it; if it seems too wet, add a few tablespoons of flour.

The dough should feel smooth, soft, and only slightly sticky.

Fermenting the dough for the first time
Place the dough in the warmed clean bowl and cover it with plastic wrap. Let ferment for 1 hour, or until just slightly puffed. While the dough is fermenting, prepare the apples.

Preparing the apples
Peel, quarter, and core the apples. Cut each quarter lengthwise in half, then cut each slice crosswise in half if the apple was medium size, or into three pieces if the apple was large; you should end up with large squarish chunks. Measure out 4 1/2 heaping cups (660 grams/23 ounces) of chunks (reserve any extra for another use) and transfer them to a covered container. (Braeburns do not brown excessively, but if you are using another variety and are concerned about over-browning, toss the apples with a few drops of lemon juice.)

Rolling out the dough and adding the apples
Sprinkle the dough and your work surface with flour and pull the dough out of the bowl. Cut the dough into two equal pieces and keep one piece covered while you work on the other. Roll out the dough into a 16-inch (41-cm) square about 1/8 inch (3 mm) thick. Scatter 1 heaping cup of the apples over the center third of the dough, then fold up the bottom third to cover them. Press the dough into the apples to try to seal it around them. Scatter another heaping cup over the folded-over apple-filled portion of the dough and fold the top of the dough over it to create a very stuffed letter fold. Press down on the dough to try to push out any air pockets and to seal it around the apples. Roll the dough up from a short side into a chunky cylinder, push the dough into the bowl with the smooth side up, and cover it with plastic wrap. Repeat with the other piece of dough and put it in a second covered bowl or other container. Let the dough ferment for about another hour, or until slightly risen and very soft.

Shaping and proofing the dough
Oil two 8-inch (20-cm) round cake pans or 8 1/2-by-4 1/2-inch (18.5-by-8.5-cm) loaf pans. Using as much dusting flour as you need, pat each dough half as best as you can into a rough round or log shape, trying to keep the dough’s smooth skin intact over the top. You will not be able to deflate the dough much at this point because of the apples. Slip the dough into the pans smooth side up and cover well with plastic wrap. (The shaped loaves can be refrigerated for up to 24 hours, which will only intensify their flavor.) Let the loaves proof until they have risen over the edges of their pans, about 30 minutes (or up to 1 1/2 hours if the loaves have been refrigerated).

Immediately after shaping the breads (or 30 minutes before baking if the loaves have been refrigerated), arrange an oven rack in the lower third position, remove any racks above it, and preheat the oven to 350°F (180°C/gas mark 4).

Baking the loaves
When the loaves have risen and do not push back when gently pressed with your finger but remain indented, brush each one with a generous tablespoon of oil, then sprinkle them with a few tablespoons of sugar to form a sugary-oily crust. Bake for 45 to 55 minutes, until very well browned. After the first 40 minutes of baking, switch the pans from front to back so that the breads brown evenly. When the loaves are done, remove them from the oven, unmold them, and let them cool on a rack.

Pre-Holiday Fun with Apples and Honey

In honor of the Jewish New Year, check out two upcoming opportunities for hands-on experiences with the Rosh Hashanah staples of apples and honey.

Beekeeping Workshop with Etz Chayim

When: Sunday, September 18, 4:00 – 6:00 p.m.

Where: Walter Jones Farm, K Street & New Jersey Avenue, NW

Join Jewish environmental group Etz Chayim for a pre-Rosh Hashana urban beekeeping workshop with DC Honeybees and local beekeepers. Visit the hive, taste the honey, and explore: Beekeeping in the urban environment, bees’ role in agriculture, benefits of beekeeping, Judaism and honey, and an orientation to a hive and tools.  Proceeds will help Etz Chayim raise money to install a hive!

RSVP to: Etzchayimhee@gmail.com.

Pick Your Own Apples for Rosh Hashanah

When: Sunday, September 25, 10:00 a.m. (Drive of 45-60 minutes)

Where: Apple-picking will take place Butlers Orchard in Germantown, MD. Meet at Kesher Israel, 2801 N Street Northwest, to drive over

Click here to RSVP for participation and rides to/from the orchard.  There is no charge for this event.  The only cost is what you pick to bring home with you.

For more information or if you would like to get involved with the Green Group, please contact Candace Nachman at greengroup@kesher.org.