Jewish Beyond The Tent Facilitator of the Week – Meleia

Though originally from the midwest, Meleia Egger is now a veteran Washingtonian. She also just happens to be a veteran of GatherDC’s Beyond The Tent Retreat. This year, she will be coming back to serve as a facilitator. We caught up with Meleia to chat about her experience at the retreat, as well as what she likes best (and least) about living in the District.

Where are you from originally, and how long have you been in D.C.?

I’m originally from Madison, Wisconsin. I will, as of this September, have been a Washingtonian for seven years!

What do you love best about living in D.C.?

So much! Rock Creek Park. Roof-decks. The food scene. The amazing neighborhoods. The Malcolm X Park drum circle. Jazz in the sculpture garden. The diversity. The happy hour and brunch culture. The healthy/running/yoga culture (to work off the brunch and happy hours). The summer HEAT!

Sounds like you have a lot that keeps you busy! Do you have time for any other hobbies?

Bird-watching, yoga, and spoken word – particularly storytelling and poetry.

What’s one thing you would change about D.C. if you could?

The extremely loud sirens going off so frequently.

How do you connect with your Judaism?

Community, conversation and creativity!

I know you’ve been on the Beyond The Tent Retreat, and you are coming back this year as a facilitator. What do you think the benefits of going on the Beyond The Tent Retreat are?

Connecting to nature, stepping back from your routine, and thinking about what it means to be a Jew in new ways!

What will you be doing in your role as a facilitator for Beyond The Tent this year?

I’ll be leading discussions, modeling vulnerability, and holding space for the participants while bringing my own perspective to it all.

What is one thing you couldn’t get through the day without?

My morning yoga.

EDITOR’S NOTE:  TO SIGN UP FOR BEYOND THE TENT, CLICK HERE!

Meet the Mifgash!

This week marks the arrival of the Israelis from the Jewish Federation of Greater Washington’s Reverse Mifgash program. From May 15th until May 25th, 11 participants from all over Israel will immerse themselves in the Jewish-American experience by joining an array of activities from, Shabbat dinners to baseball games to our GatherDC Happy Hour tonight! For those interested in joining any of the activities, check out our list! We spoke with some participants prior to their arrival on our shores to get a better sense of who they are. Read on and you’ll have some nice icebreakers for tonights Happy Hour!

Keren Asaf

I was in the U.S. once before, for my Bat-Mitzvah.

I’m looking forward to visiting the United States, meeting new people with a different way of life, and seeing D.C.

The reason I wanted to participate in Reverse Mifgash is that I was interested to see the Jewish community outside of Israel. I want to meet people and hear about their life and learn what their perspectives are of Israel.

I hope to meet new friends and to feel more committed to my life in Israel and my Judaism. In Israel, we take our Jewish community, holidays, etc., for granted but I guess it is not like that in America.

 

Joe Graham

I have been to the US once, a year ago, visiting family in New York and Las Vegas.

I am most looking forward to meeting new people and connecting with some old friends. I am also very excited about getting to know the culture (both Jewish and general) of the D.C. area.

I hope to take back to Israel great experiences and memories, and also friendships that will last.

 

Dolev Elbaz

I have actually been to the U.S. twice. When I was between the ages of one and three, my family lived in Sacramento, California, where my father studied for his Master’s degree and my mother taught Shalom School (a Jewish day-school). Of course I don’t remember much, but technically I was there. The second time was on a family trip when I was 12 years old (2003). We traveled for about 2 months visiting the West Coast, Chicago, Canada and then the East Coast (including a few days in D.C.). I’m really looking forward to meeting my friends from Birthright and enjoying D.C, with them as an adult. I believe it will be a totally different experience than what I had as a young boy.

I’m excited about the opportunity to experience D.C. and the U.S. with local friends and learn about the Jewish community abroad. I think this is something unique to Reverse Mifgash since we get to meet a lot of people from the Jewish Federation and hear about their work in the community.

I hope to take back some great memories. Secondly, I would like to return with the feeling that Israel has a great Jewish community in the U.S. that supports it. Also, I will be happy to keep in touch with some more friends from D.C.

Adi Amsalem

This will be my first time in the States.

I’m looking forward to being exposed to the daily life of the Jewish community, seeing how Jews live abroad.

I want to enrich my knowledge about Jews as an authentic group in America, and hope to take home some strong memories.

 

Itzhak Zander

This is my first time in the U.S.

 I’m looking forward to seeing people, sites, culture – everything that is different than in Israel!

I really want to feel how Americans feel when they come to Israel with Taglit.

I hope to gain new friends. Besides that, I hope to get a new perspective about  the term ‘community’.

 

Ohad Shturm

I’ve never been to the U.S. before. This will be my first time!

 I’m looking forward to meeting with my friends from the Shorashim bus, back from July 2013. I’m also very excited about meeting with the Jewish community in D.C., going to museums and generally just traveling around somewhere I don’t know. I haven’t done something like this in a while.

I hope I get a chance to learn as much as I can about the way the Jewish people live in the U.S. and discuss all kind of topics.

 

 

Top 5 Places to Get Cheesecake in DC for Shavuot and Beyond

Why we eat cheesecake and other dairy products on Shavuot has long been debated. Whatever the reason you eat cheesecake, you want to eat the best. That’s why we prepared this list of the best cheesecake spots in DC. Is your favorite on the list?

Capital City Cheesecake Mini Cheesecakes

#5 – CAPITAL CITY CHEESECAKES (Takoma Park, MD)

With two sisters at the helm, this Takoma Park, MD bakery prides itself on its cheesecakes. With 12 flavors, including one vegan option (!), their mini cheesecakes can be ordered individually or by the dozen. Almost all flavors come in their 9″ pies as well.

 

 

 

Truckeroo Photo of That Cheesecake Truck

#4 – THAT CHEESECAKE TRUCK (Mobile)

If you can find it, it will make your day. This truck serves mini-cheesecakes in various flavors. Their products are supplied by Sweetz Cheesecake, a storefront out in Gaithersburg, MD. Try to get their Brown Sugar Bourbon if it’s on the menu when you track the truck down!

Buttercream Mini

 

#3 – BUTTERCREAM BAKERY (Shaw)

Shaw’s sweetest addition to 9th Street is the perfect place to stop for your cheesecake fix if you look like this when you’re around baked goods. Each day, these bakers prepare a cheesecake of the day, bundled in a perfect 4 oz. treat for your taste buds and your waistline.

 

 

 

Dog Tag Bakery Selection

#2 – DOG TAG BAKERY (Georgetown)

While variety of cheesecake is not their strong point, these guys serve up some of the best Key Lime Cheesecake north of the Keys. Oh, and they get bonus points for their inspiring tikkun olam (healing the world) business model by employing disabled veterans!

 

Cakeroom’s Red Velvet Cheesecake

#1 – CAKEROOM (Adams Morgan)

This place does pretty much anything with flour, sugar and butter right. But, their cheesecakes are particularly amazing. With 13 flavors to choose from, including Caramel Macchiato, Red Velvet and Oreo, you won’t know where to start. If you’re going at night, arrive there early since they tend to get pretty bare-shelved by 7pm.

 

 

 

For more on how to celebrate Shavuot in DC, check out our Shavuot Guide 2017/5777.

Shavuot Guide 2017/5777

Also known as “Feast of the Weeks,” you may know Shavuot as “The Holiday Where We Eat Cheesecake.”

Not only does the holiday, which begins the evening of May 30th and ends the evening of June 1st, have several names, it also celebrates more than one religious observance. Shavuot both celebrates the early summer’s grain harvest (in Israel) and also G-d giving the Torah on Mount Sinai to the Jewish people. It has become customary to eat dairy and study, debate and analyze Torah late into the night. This is called a Tikkun Leil Shavuot. In recent years, many Jews have started to reimagine Shavuot…engaging not only with traditional Torah texts, but also with more contemporary texts and art.

However you decide to mark the holiday, we’ve got your guide for doing it in DC!

Events

Missing something? Submit it to our calendar, and then shoot us an email.

May 22nd

THE TEN – Jews and Muslims in America: Political Challenges and Moral Opportunities

May 24th

Shavuot: It’s Complicated

May 25th

What They Saw at Sinai at Sixth & I

May 30th

Shavuot @ Adas Israel: Recreating the Space Between Heaven and Earth

Shavuot with Tikkun Leil Shabbat and Bet Mishpachah

Shavuot Part I: Dessert Oneg and All-Night Learning with Chabad

May 31st

Shavuot Part II: 10 Commandments and Dairy Buffet at Chabad

June 7th

The Unkosher Comedy Tour: Up All Night

Food for Shavuot

Our Picks for the Top 5 Places for Cheesecake in DC

Shavuot Recipes from Federation’s Jewish Food Experience

Shavuot, without Cheese (via Tablet)

Recipes for a Sans Dairy Shavuot (via Federation’s Jewish Food Experience)

New Addition to On Rye’s Menu for Shavuot – Dairy-Based Push Pops

More Shavuot Resources

My Jewish Learning – Shavuot Basics

The Best Cheese Puns Ever via Buzzfeed

Video: Why Do Jews Eat Cheesecake on Shavuot? –

Video: Sixth & I’s Rabbi Shira Stutman Talks Shavuot –

Video: This Hilarious Song –

Spotted in Jewish DC – On Rye’s Awesome SWAG

Whether you’ve tasted their modern take on Jewish deli food or not, you’ll certainly have a craving for On Rye‘s creative piece of SWAG, which happens to be our #SpottedinJewishDC feature this week.

This awesome design that pays homage to the Helvetica List shirts of 2012.  It makes your mouth water on the front and then sports an “On Rye” logo on the back. While this beauty only comes in a sweatshirt (not ideal for summers in DC), pick up one now either in store on online. Or, enter to win one through our contest!

We asked Co-Owner, Ilyse Fishman Lerner, about the sweatshirt’s origin. She said she wanted to create something modern but comfortable. Comfortable it is, made from Bella + Canvas fleece, which is super wearable and soft.

 Want to win a sweatshirt of your very own! Enter the contest! We’ll announce the winners Friday!

Spot something particularly Jewish in DC? Let us know about it by emailing or snapping a photo and posting it on social with #SpottedinJewishDC. You may see it here!

Rabbi Rant – Proud, Jewish and Disconnected? Beyond the Tent Might be the Answer

You don’t have to look very hard to find an excuse for not wanting to connect Jewishly.

Many of us can find one by simply thinking back to childhood:

-You hated Hebrew school.
-Synagogue was boring.
-Your Hillel was too religious.
-A rabbi once said something offensive or hurtful.
-Being Jewish made you feel like an outsider at school.
-You or your family were judged or even alienated for “how” Jewish you were or weren’t.

Others of us may gravitate toward present-day excuses:

-You feel you don’t have enough Jewish knowledge to engage.
-You didn’t have the same experiences that every other Jew seems to have had.
-Your beliefs and values seem incompatible with the Jewish community.
-You’re worried about Judaism eclipsing other important pieces of your identity.
-Jewish programs seem overly focused on helping you find a partner.
-It feels like everyone already knows each other.

These (and there are many more) are all legitimate reasons to leave your Jewish identity unexplored, and I’m sure most people reading this will find one or more of these reasons resonates.

Yet, an overwhelming percentage of American Jews (94%) are proud to be Jewish.

And herein lies the paradox of 21st century American Jewry – we’re proud of something that we feel disconnected from and haven’t taken the time to seriously explore.

It’s not that we’re not open to exploring our Judaism or feeling more connected to it. It’s just that we have so many paths out and so few paths in.

This is why GatherDC created the Beyond the Tent Retreat – to present a few alternative paths into Jewish life that are compelling and meaningful for us today. This retreat won’t erase your Jewish baggage or resolve all the problems with the Jewish community. But it will validate your experience and allow you and other like-minded Jewish 20s and 30s in DC to take ownership over your Jewish identity.

It’s not hard to find the type of Judaism that doesn’t work for you. Why not spend a little time searching for a type of Judaism that does?

Our upcoming retreat is July 21-23, so if you’re interested and available, you should apply today! Early applications close on Friday, May 26.

 

Jewish Composter of the Week – Jeremy

If you’ve been to the Farmer’s Market in Dupont Circle, you’ve probably seen Jeremy Brosowsky. As owner of Compost Cab, Jeremy sets up shop each week collecting your uneaten food in order to turn it into amazing compost goodness. He’s been at it since 2010 but has recently picked up even more steam, now running DC’s new citywide dropoff program on behalf of the DC Department of Public Works.

Still not convinced? Read on to learn how something as simple as composting can make the world a better place. Bonus: Jeremy has set up a promo code for our readers and will donate half of the first month’s proceeds to GatherDC!

How did you first get into composting? 

My interest in composting comes out of my interest in food. It’s a very typical story. After my first child was born, I became acutely aware of everything that we were feeding her. And the more I learned about food and food systems, the more interested I became in the prospect of growing food in and around the city. Fast forward a few years and a few kids, and we were doing a lot right — cooking at home, shopping at farmers markets, etc. But we were still throwing our waste in the garbage, and that really, really bothered me

What made you want to start your own composting business?

Compost Cab exists to do two things. Make it easier for people to compost, and make it easier for urban agriculture to thrive.

I started Compost Cab in large part to solve my own family’s problem. We knew we wanted to compost, but we live in the city — we were worried about rats in the alley, we didn’t have any space to do it right, and with four small children, we didn’t feel like we had the time to do it ourselves. And then my entrepreneurial instincts kicked in.

The more I learned about food systems, the clearer it became that there are two ways to grow food efficiently and intensively in an urban environment. There’s the vertical greenhouse model, which takes advantage of technology requires aeroppnics and hydroponics and other generally capital intensive solutions. And then there’s the fertile soil model, which lets you grow your plants closer together because the soil is nutrient dense. You can maximize your per square foot production in the city through composting. But it turns out that for most urban agriculture projects, acquiring the raw materials for composting in city was a significant challenge.

We put two and two together and created a business that supports community composting and urban agriculture while enabling people to live their values every day.

Why do you think it’s important for people to compost?

For starters, there are all the environmental benefits of composting: reducing waste landfill, reducing methane released into the environment, etc. But beyond all that we’ve discovered that composting is a gateway drug for sustainability writ large. Composting is a daily, affirmative act of sustainability. Unlike other little steps you can take to improve your carbon footprint, like installing LEDs or a rain barrel (which are great things to do!), composting is something you and your family do every day. It’s a powerful tool for behavioral change.

What kind of foods can and cannot be composted?

If it grows, it goes. That is, anything that is organic can be composted. Food of all sorts, paper products, leaves, grass — you name it.  But if you want to compost in your backyard, or through a community based program such as ours, you want to keep proteins out for a bunch of reasons. We have a comprehensive dos-and-don’ts list on our website at compostcab.com.

What if I’m afraid that composting is going to make my apartment smell bad? 

We have a saying that speaks directly to that issue. If it smells bad, you’re doing it wrong. Like anything else, composting requires effort, but when done properly, which means creating a proper mix of carbon, nitrogen, oxygen and water, composting smells more like the forest, not the landfill. Or, you can join Compost Cab, and we can pick up your food scraps and compost them for you. Or, you can drop off your food scraps through DC’s new citywide dropoff program, which we’re running on behalf of the DC Department of Public Works.

Do you ever get grossed out by dealing with rotten food? 

Never. To be candid, we (almost) never have any issues with really gross stuff. We take education, outreach, and communication with our members and partners very seriously. As a result we’ve created a super clean stream of compostable material.

How do you connect with the DC Jewish Community?

We’ve been working with Jewish organizations since we started back in 2010. For many years we’ve been donating our services to the DCJCC for their annual Everything But the Turkey Thanksgiving volunteer event, in partnership with DC Central Kitchen. We’ve composted the Labor Seder for Jews United for Justice. We do regular presentations at day schools and synagogues across the region. And then personally, my family is very active in DC Minyan (a community which we helped start), as well as at JPDS (where are four of my children have gone to school). Generally speaking, Jews bend toward environmental stewardship and activism, and we’re proud to help enable those instincts in the realm of sustainability generally, and composting and urban agriculture in particular.

 If I’ve never composted before, what’s the first thing I can do to get started?

Head over to compostcab.com. We’ll point you toward DIY resources or how to participate in a dropoff program. Or you can sign up for our home service: we’ll deliver you a collection bin and get you up and composting in no time. To make it even easier to get started, we’ve created a promo code just for Gather DC readers. Anyone who signs up for our home service in May using the promo code GATHERDC will receive half off their first month of service, and we’ll donate the other half to GatherDC!

The views and opinions expressed in this blog and on this website are solely those of the original authors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of the organization GatherDC, the GatherDC staff, the GatherDC board, and/or any/all contributors to this site.

Israel Comes to DC!

From May 15th to May 25th, The Jewish Federation of Greater Washington (JFGW) will welcome 11 Israeli young adults for a 10-day immersive “Reverse Birthright” experience called Reverse Mifgash. Over the course of their stay, JFGW will host multiple events that are open to the community so that we here in DC can meet and greet the Israelis while also participating in lots of different of events, ranging from pure fun to spiritual. Below, we have highlighted some of our favorite events (including our own GatherDC Happy Hour). We hope to see you there! For a full list of events, you can visit JFGW’s Website by clicking here.

Tuesday, May 16

Federation’s Imagine Israel Changemakers Series
7:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.
Whittmore House, Washington, DC
Oren Helman, disability advocate and true Israel changemaker, has transformed the way the Israeli workforce employs, integrates and includes workers with disabilities in the work place. Learn how his advocacy efforts with Israel’s Knesset (legislative body) created new employment regulations that champion the rights of individuals with disabilities and set a standard practice which other countries can emulate.
Register Now

Wednesday, May 17

GatherDC May Happy Hour
6:00 p.m. – 9:00 p.m.
H Street Country Club, Washington, DC
Share a drink with and get to know our special Israeli guests from Reverse Mifgash.  Meet new people in the DC Jewish community and connect with old friends!
Join us!

Thursday, May 18

Film Screening of “Moos”
6:30 p.m.
E Street Cinema, Washington DC
Enjoy this charming whimsical Dutch tale of love, laughter and the true value of friendship. Moos is one of several films being featured at the Edlavitch DCJCC’s 27th Annual Washington Jewish Film Festival, (one of the largest and most respected Jewish film festivals in North America).
Register Now

Friday, May 19

Good Soul Shabbat
6:15 p.m.-10:00 p.m.
Sixth & I Historic Synagague
Join us as Rabbi Scott, Aaron Shneyer and Michal Bilick offer soulful acoustic music, deep spirituality and a thoughtful Shabbat service that will fill the sanctuary with the spirited sound of new tunes and old favorites. Stay for Shabbat dinner with other community members.
Register Now

Viral Shabbat
10:00 p.m.
Moishe House, Washington DC
Keep the Shabbat ruach (spirit) going late into the night with a welcoming and festive multi-generational Shabbat experience. Enjoy food, drinks and the sounds of singer-song leader, Ben Lovenheim.
Sign up

Saturday, May 20

Havdalah on the National Mall
9:30 p.m.
Lincoln Memorial, Washington DC
Experience a special Havdalah service overlooking DC’s beautiful monuments from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.
RSVP today

Blue & White Party
10:30 p.m.
Mission, Washington DC
Celebrate Israel’s 69th birthday with Federation’s Young Leadership, BBYO Friends and Alumni Network, Israel House at the Embassy of Israel and the Israeli-American Council (IAC) Get ready to schmooze, mingle and listen to great music with visiting Israeli guests and other members of the community. Ticket includes one premium cocktail or mocktail.
Buy tickets

Sunday May 21

Israel Ride: Spin Class at Vida Fitness
Class 1: 9:00 a.m. – 9:45 a.m.
Class 2: 10:00 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.
Vida at The Yards, Washington DC
Get your shvtiz on with Federation’s Reverse Mifgash Israeli guests and Vida spin instructor (and former Birthright trip leader from bus #43), Blair Mann.
Register Now

Doing Good with Mitzvah Hoppin’
1:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m.
Sixth & I Historic Synagague
Feel good by doing good with a hands-on-volunteer project that will benefit homeless LGBTQ youth in DC. Federation will join with members of the Edlavitch DCJCC’s EntryPoint and GLOE to make hygiene kits that will greatly benefit this at-risk population.
Register to Do Good

Monday, May 22

Craft Cocktail Class
6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Duke’s Grocery, Washington DC
Ever wanted to mix some tasty cocktails? Join Federation’s Young Leadership, 11 Israeli guests from Reverse Mifgash and members of the Greater Washington community for a craft cocktail experience at Duke’s Grocery. Learn to make a few classics, and then enjoy them with friends from Israel and D.C.  Ticket includes craft cocktails (or mocktails) and light vegetarian appetizers.
Register here

Tuesday, May 23

Pre-Game at the Bullpen
5:30 p.m.-7:00 p.m.
The Bullpen
Share a drink and schmooze with others before the Nationals take on the Mariners at Nats Park.
No reservation required

Reverse Mifgash at the Ballpark!
7:05 p.m.-10:00 p.m.
Nationals Park
This night is sure to be a homerun…come cheer for the Washington Nationals as they take on the Seattle Mariners.
Buy tickets

For more questions about any Reverse Mifgash events, contact Kira Borman at kira.borman@shalomdc.org or call 301-348-7343.

The views and opinions expressed in this blog and on this website are solely those of the original authors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of the organization GatherDC, the GatherDC staff, the GatherDC board, and/or any/all contributors to this site.

Spotted in Jewish DC – The Den’s Cookbook Recipe of the Month

Depending on your interest, The Den is either the coffeehouse/wine bar in Politics and Prose, or the coffeehouse/wine bar with Politics and Prose in it. Wherever your loyalties, chances are you’ve been to bothand love them for the community and cultural epicenters they are.

This week, we’re spotlighting The Den’s ‘Cookbook Recipe of the Month’ for our #SpottedinJewishDC feature. If you’re not familiar with this fun monthly menu special, the chefs at The Den select a recipe each month from a cookbook that Politics and Prose sells, and adds it to their menu. This month, they’re featuring the Cauliflower Salad from Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi’s Jerusalem: A Cookbook.

The recipe features celery, parsley, hazelnuts, pomegranate, spiced vinaigrette on a bed of local greens and is $9.50 before tax. This is not a bad price considering buying all of the ingredients to make it at home will be at least that. They will be featuring it for a limited time only, so hurry in!

Spot something particularly Jewish in DC? Send it our way via email or tag it on social media with #SpottedinJewishDC. You may see it here sometime soon.

 

 

The views and opinions expressed in this blog and on this website are solely those of the original authors. These views and opinions do not necessarily represent those of the organization GatherDC, the GatherDC staff, the GatherDC board, and/or any/all contributors to this site.

 

5 Things We Heart About Marc Maron

Marc Maron is probably best known for his twice-weekly podcast WTF. Since 2009, Maron has shown himself to be one of the best interviewers in the business, providing listeners with intimate conversations (conducted in his garage!) with everyone from the late Robin Williams to former President Obama. He has often talked at length about his Judaism in interesting ways, discussing his lack of spiritual connection while feeling a strong cultural identity. Perhaps his best take on this was in his book, The Jerusalem Syndrome.

In honor of his performance at the Warner Theater here in DC this weekend, we’ve compiled a list of the top 5 Things We Heart About Marc Maron.

In His First Few Podcasts, He Clearly Had No Idea What He Was Doing

WTF did not come out fully formed. In the early episodes, Marc was not only struggling with his recent divorce and his newfound unemployment after being fired from Air America, but also with finding the voice of the show. At first, it operated somewhat similarly to a morning radio show, with Marc making prank calls to his dad and having fake guests calling in to chat (God, for instance). Though he certainly found his footing eventually, nothing sums up the early days like his monologue on how and why you should steal food from Whole Foods (which GatherDC does not advise).

The Louis CK Episode

Likely the show that put him on the map, Marc and Louis spend two hours hashing out who was at fault for ruining their friendship (spoiler alert: it was Marc). Over the course of their conversation you listen as two old friends start out icy and distant and end with tearful promises to work harder to be better friends. Louis would later go on to have Marc appear on his television show, but in a role reversal, Marc was the spurned friend.

His Cameo in Almost Famous

Everyone who listens to WTF knows that the show starts out with the catchphrase, “Lock the Gates,” but not everyone knows that those words came directly from Marc’s role as a mean-spirited club owner in Almost Famous.

He Talked to the President Like a Person

In what is arguably his most famous interview, Marc gets deep with President Obama regarding race, cynicism and our divided country. Equally entertaining was the follow-up episode in which Marc recounted how the interview came to be, as well as how the Secret Service shut down his entire neighborhood to make it happen. Marc has saved the coffee cup the president drank from while in his garage and now keeps it encased in glass on his desk.

His Upcoming Role in the Netflix Series GLOW

Jenji Kohan’s (Orange is the New Black) latest is a Netflix series called GLOW (Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling) starring Alison Brie and, yes, Marc Maron. In his first major role (outside of playing himself on his IFC show, Maron), Marc will play a “Washed-up Hollywood director who has a very complicated history with women – and now must lead 14 of them on the journey to wrestling stardom.” Yes please.