Posts

Masa Israel Featured Internship: Marketing Internship, Hebrew Today

As an intern at Hebrew today you will be responsible for marketing via social media outlets and other internet sources. Daily tasks involve contacting various distributions internationally along with assisting Hebrew today staff in administrative matters.

Hebrew Today is a publication house specializing in the highly professional and unique fusion of linguistics and journalism. Their products are developed and written by professionals in the fields of education, linguistics and the Hebrew language. From their experience and knowledge, these professionals create easy newspapers in Hebrew, along with the highest quality of tools for Hebrew learning.

Hebrew Today Publication House is based in Jerusalem and ships their easy Hebrew newspapers to private and organizational subscribers internationally. Their publications are recognized by the Israeli Ministry of Education and recommended by the Jewish Agency for Israel.

http://www.interninisrael.org/marketing-internship-hebrew-today/

Masa Israel Featured Internship: News Content Analyst, Wibbitz

You will take part in the revolution of news consumption and will join the Wibbitz content team. You should be passionate about the news industry and have wide area of interests in news, politics, finance, sports and entertainment.

Responsibilities include finding trends in world news researching for specific events, analysis of Wibbitz clips, collaborating on content for Wibbitz platform, assisting in quality assurance when needed, and being an active participant in Wibbitz Happy Hour.

Wibbitz is a technology startup aiming to change the way we consume information on mobile devices. Wibbitz automatically re-packages textual content into rich and informative video summaries that can be watched conveniently on mobile screens, at home or on the go. Wibbitz is very cool and young company located in the heart of Tel Aviv.

World’s Largest Shabbat Dinner to take place in Tel Aviv

 

The Most Interesting Jew in the World - Screenshot of fundraising clip for White City Shabbat's Guinness World's Largest Shabbat Dinner in theme of Dos Equis beer commercial. Photo credit: courtesy of White City Shabbat

The Most Interesting Jew in the World – Screenshot of fundraising clip for White City Shabbat’s Guinness World’s Largest Shabbat Dinner in theme of Dos Equis beer commercial. Photo credit: courtesy of White City Shabbat

White City Shabbat has announced that it will be setting the Guinness World Record for the World’s Largest Shabbat Dinner set to take place in the Spring of 2014 at the Tel Aviv Port.

In order to break the record, over 1,000 Israelis and new immigrants must attend the dinner.  The guest list will also include notable Israelis including Tel Aviv Mayor Ron Huldai, former chief rabbi of Israel Rabbi Yisrael Meir Lau, and Deputy Minister of Religious Affairs, Eli Ben-Dahan.  In keeping with White City Shabbat’s mission statement of “Shabbat for all,” the dinner will be free of charge.  This week, White City Shabbat launched a creative Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign – mimicking the theme of Dos Equis commercials – to raise the $25,000 needed to cover the costs of this historic event.

A non-profit organization entirely run by volunteers, White City Shabbat is hoping that the Guinness title will encourage Jews worldwide to celebrate Shabbat in their own communities.  “While White City Shabbat is going to be the first organization to attempt this record, our hope is that in years to come communities around the world will come together to try and surpass the standard we set this year,” said Jay Shultz,  one of the event’s organizers who is often dubbed “the international mayor of Tel Aviv.”

Tel Aviv is known as being the economic and cultural epicenter of Israel, but the event organizers are hoping the World’s Largest Shabbat Dinner will showcase another side to Tel Aviv, its spiritual side.  “With more and more immigrants choosing to make Tel Aviv their home, celebrating the first ever World’s Largest Shabbat Dinner with Guinness will further establish Tel Aviv as one of the most important cities for the Jewish people today,” said Eytan White, co-director of White City Shabbat.  White’s partner, Deborah Danan, agrees.  “Shabbat is the cornerstone of the Jewish faith and as such has the power to bring people together,” said Danan.  “Tel Aviv has a unique demography of mainly young professionals.  Couple that with its mix of immigrants and natives who are both religious and secular and its overarching atmosphere of openness and inclusivity, makes Tel Aviv the perfect city to host an event of this magnitude.”

Over 10,000 people have already attended White City Shabbat’s monthly meals and each one is packed to capacity with over 200 people in attendance and another 100 plus on waiting lists.  “At any given White City Shabbat dinner, you’ll hear about ten languages spoken and World’s Largest Shabbat Dinner will be no exception.  We’d like to see Jews from all over the globe take part in this event, either to come and enjoy this spectacular demonstration of Jewish peoplehood in person or by donating to our fundraising efforts.  After all, Shabbat is the soul of the Jewish people and Tel Aviv is a focal point of the Jewish world,” says Natalie Solomon, a new immigrant from Birmingham, Alabama and another of the event’s organizers.

To make a contribution to White City Shabbat’s World’s Largest Shabbat Dinner, please click here.

UK Toremet is the fiscal sponsor of the World’s Largest Shabbat Dinner. Partial sponsors include the City of Tel Aviv-Yafo, Hanger 11, Golan Heights Winery and NakedSea Salt.

For more information, pictures or media inquiries, contact deborah@whitecityshabbat.com

WCS logoAbout White City Shabbat:

White City Shabbat is the premiere portal of Jewish Life in Tel Aviv.  Bringing the concept of Shabbat dinner parties to a wider community, the organization hosts its own private, warm, welcoming, all-inclusive Shabbat meals every month.  White City Shabbat also hosts holiday celebrations and meals, Jewish learning series, beginners learning minyan, and inter-community programming.  To learn more about White City Shabbat visit www.WhiteCityShabbat.com and to read more about the campaign or to make a donation, visit www.igg.me/at/WorldsLargestShabbat.

Masa Israel Featured Internship: Innovation Center Associate, SingTel

SingTel is looking for highly intelligent, technology-savvy interns to work on two initiatives in Israel: innov8, a corporate venture capital fund, and L!ifeLabs @ Israel, an open-innovation and Scouting-Marketing-partnerships activity.

Responsibilities may include technology scouting and dealflow management support, attending startup events and presenting SingTel to startup companies, business development both externally and internally in SingTel (i.e helping to showcase startups internally and engage business owners), as well as helping to shape the innovation process in the new GDL Business Unit (Group Digital Life).

Required skills
• Very strong communication skills – written and oral
• Hands on motivated go-getter that can take a project and see it through
• Team player, emphatic and sociable with a no-ego mindset
• Tech savvy

The SingTel Group is Asia’s leading communications group with almost 500 million mobile subscribers, providing a diverse range of communication services and solutions, including fixed, mobile, data, Internet, info-communications technology, satellite and pay TV. In addition, the SingTel Group is a long-term strategic investor in regional mobile operators in India, Indonesia, the Philippines, Thailand.

SingTel’s L!feLabs @ Israel focuses on reaching out to the Israel innovation community, developing SingTel’s capabilities in key focus areas as well as conducting proof of concepts leading to the commercialization of products and services. The organization is focused on creating new growth engines by delighting customers with innovative and cutting-edge digital services beyond traditional telephony, mobile, broadband and video offerings.

SingTel Innov8 (Innov8), a wholly-owned subsidiary of the SingTel Group, is a corporate Venture Capital fund, with its own set of decision making, approval and funding processes. It has an initial fund size of $250 million.

International Marketing Internship, Ma’agan Real Estate Development

Ma’agan Real Estate Development is looking to expand its marketing channels to an international audience.

Interns will gain experience in the following areas: mapping and understanding the local community and its populations, focusing on the potential buyers/local real-estate agents who promote Israeli real estate; locating in each community the Point Of Contact specializing in Israeli real estate; identifying real estate fairs in each community; and other duties.

Ma’agan is a real estate development firm that is now working on promoting their luxury building Home on Habima – a boutique project that provides a perfect living experience with a high quality of life, unique location, designed for comfort, peace and quiet, and for entertaining guests, with an original Tel Aviv atmosphere.

http://www.interninisrael.org/israeli-real-estate-international-marketing-maagan-real-estate-development/

Masa Israel Featured Internship: SEO Start-up internship, TinyTap

Interns for TinyTap will gain experience with SEO, while completing admin type work. Examples include uploading screenshots, doing QA for their apps, etc.

TinyTap is an application which allows users to create, share, and play educational games for kids. It is a simple platform for game creation where anyone, regardless of age, can create interactive activities and share them with their community of thousands of users.

http://www.interninisrael.org/seo-start-up-internship-tinytap/

Exile No More: A New Documentary Film

exile no moreFor decades, South Tel Aviv has been the first and last stop for all types of “second-class citizens” who cannot stand on their own and have been ignored by the government for far too long.  Today, South Tel Aviv’s Israeli residents are living with over 15,000 African asylum seekers unable to care for themselves, and even worse, in fear for their safety.  In the past year, violence between Africans and Israelis in South Tel Aviv and around the country has risen and many are afraid to walk the streets.

Deep in the heart of South Tel Aviv, seen through the eyes of Israeli residents and African asylum seekers, Exile No More documents what it means to live in exile, amongst your own.  This 30-minute film follows the story of African asylum seekers in Israel.  After traveling thousands of miles, many have found themselves without status, without jobs, and without homes in the most impoverished area of Tel Aviv.  Exile No More shares the story of African asylum seekers such as Kidane Isaacs, a 24-year-old Eritrean who has lived in Israel for more than 6 years now, without any form of refugee status.  The film follows his story as an African fleeing country after country, arriving in Israel, becoming a strong political leader, and inspiring his people to demand more.  Just across the road, Shula Keshet, a veteran Israeli in South Tel Aviv is making impressive progress in her efforts to bring together conservative Israelis living with a completely new population in Israel: African refugees.  These two story lines in Exile No More come together to represent an exiled people in their own community and the struggle for real change in their government.  Filmed over the period of eight months, the characters in this film represent the key political leaders at a time when asylum seekers in Israel are facing a true crossroad.

photo-mainFilmmaker Kady Buchanan has spent the last year and a half working on the film, and is currently in post-production readying the film for release.  In asking what drew her to the film, she says it seemed like such an important topic, one that, because of Israel’s history as a nation of refugees, would only become more and more relevant.  Buchanan filmed in the summer of 2012 when protests in South Tel Aviv were breaking out almost on a weekly basis.  Buchanan also chose to follow both Israelis and Africans because she wanted to show how feeling exiled or excommunicated from your community is not only a feeling felt by non-citizens.

Buchanan had launched a Kickstarter in an effort to raise the final funds needed for the film’s release.  With only six days left to go, they still have to fund $3,000.  If all funds aren’t received by March 26th, they get nothing.  To support the finishing of the funds by donating or sharing, visit the Kickstarter page here.

A Young Doctor’s Journey in Israel Part II: Israeli Health

ICDC

Alex is spending the month in Tel Aviv as an International Fellow at the Gertner Health Policy Institute.  Over his next few columns he will share his adventures in Israel with us.

In addition to caring for Israelis in several diverse clinical settings and traveling throughout the region, during my month long fellowship in Israel I have had the privilege and honor of working with Israeli leaders in medicine and public health.

During my first week, I spent an afternoon meeting with Dr. Tami Shochat, the director of the Israeli Centers for Disease Control.  It was an honor to meet the women who leads this prestigious and important agency in Israel.  Like her colleague at our CDC, Dr. Thomas Friedman, Dr. Shochat is charged with setting the vision for prevention and disease management in Israel.  We discussed a number of her efforts, many of which centered around initiatives to collect population data on Israeli health.

Another leader who I met with was Dr. Ehud Davidson, Deputy Director General & Head of the Hospital Division at Clalit.  Clalit is Israel’s biggest health services provider and largest health insurer. For the last century, Clalit has provided care throughout Israel and now runs the largest network of hospitals in Israel.

During my conversations with Drs Shochat, Davidson and countless other clinicians and policy experts in Israel several interesting distinctions and features of the Israeli health system have come to light.

Health Care Delivery in Israel

In Israel health insurance is universal and provided for all by the government.  Through an approximately 5% tax on income, every citizen gets health insurance.  Since the 1995 National Health insurance Law, all Israeli citizens must then sign up with one of Israeli’s four HMOs (of which Clalit is the largest at 54% of all Israelis).  The HMOs pay physicians directly and in the case of Clalit, also own hospitals.

The Israeli government updates yearly its list of uniform benefits that are provided under the HMO.  No citizen can be denied these services or membership in any of the HMOs, regardless of race, age, gender, or level of health.  Israeli’s can purchase (70% do) supplementary insurance on top of their mandated plan that will allow them to see any doctor they wish and have additional available procedures and treatments beyond the uniform benefits.

pregnant_women_picturesFertility in Israel

One of the benefits of the universal health care system and the national pride in having large families is a generous infertility treatment benefit.  This is manifest in payments for in-vitro fertilization (IVF) for all women for up to two offspring.    This would be unheard of in the U.S. where each cycle of IVF can cost in the thousands and is rarely covered by insurance.

Challenges in the Israeli System

Several challenges exist in Israel in the coming years.

First, the population is getting older.  After the atrocities of the Holocaust in the mid 1940’s Jews fled to Israel seeking freedom and opportunity.  Soon afterwards they began having children and this group of ‘baby-boomers’ is now hitting the age of retirement.  As the population ages these next few years and this large group retires and becomes sicker there will be a decrease in the proportion of Israelis paying into the program compared to those using services at a higher rate.  This will create a financial challenge.  Israel uses 8% of its GDP on healthcare (compared to 18% in the US).  This rate, while very low, will likely change in the coming years as the population ages

The second issue facing Israel is providing effective care to the Arab and rural population.  Due to consanguinity (relations between blood relatives), a high proportion of Israeli Arabs have genetic illnesses.  These folks are sicker because of it and thus have a higher usage rate of health services.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAA third health care issue in Israel is the capitation fee model.  Clalit and the other 3 HMOs in Israel receive a capitation sum for each enrollee.  A capitation fee is a fixed sum of money available to pay for health services for an individual.  In the US and worldwide, the capitation model has been tried with some success.  The model often puts the onus of cost control on the HMO (and thus the physician). For every dollar the HMO spends below the capitation sum, they can save and profit from the surplus.  In Israel the capitation is age adjusted to provide larger sums for older patients who will utilize a greater amount of health services, but only recently has the government provided additional sums per year for certain patients who have certain illnesses that require additional health care utilization.  The Israeli health ministry will be working hard over the next few years to refine this list and ensure an appropriate model for health care funding.

A fourth issue for the Israeli health system is electronic health records and quality.  In the US we have created several quality measures under the ACA (Obamacare), including bonus payments for providers meeting diabetes health indicators.  We have developed the Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) which allows for increased patient access with web portals to view test results and communicate directly with their doctor, greater drug adherence by allowing physicians to prescribe electronically and monitor prescription fill rates, and improved quality by allowing the creation of groups of patients with the same illness who can be monitored for meeting standard care measures.  The U.S. has also moved to the electronic medical record (EMR).  New initiatives in Israel encourage EMRs.

A fifth issue in Israel stems directly from the ageing population; a physician shortage.  As the population ages more doctors are needed.  In response Israel has opened a fifth medical school and is increasing the enrollment of the other four.  Despite these efforts, there will be a 10 year gap while the training occurs where Israel will have a great need for physicians.  Clalit and the other HMOs are trying innovative strategies to lure doctors to their facilities (Israeli doctors are notoriously underpaid).  This will be an emerging issue for Israel over the next decade.

20130218_160904

Alex Berger, a new GTJ contributing columnist, is a native of the Washington DC Metropolitan Area.  He graduated in 2008 from the University of North Carolina and is currently in his last year of a combined MD/MPH program. He is excited to be back in the DC area and to share tips on nutrition, health, and fitness. He can be reached at Alexander_Berger@med.unc.edu.

What is “Yalla Yalla”?

At 9:30 pm on Saturday night Expo Bar will be temporarily transformed into a Tel Aviv nighclub for “Yalla, Yalla Part Deux.”  In case missed Part Un and don’t know what to expect, here’s a brief sketch of the night provided by one of the event’s co-hosts Jen N.

SR:  What does “Yalla Yalla” mean?
JN:  Colloquially, it’s used as “Come on, let’s go!”  So, in this case, you should all listen to us and come to the party!

SR:  What’s going down on Saturday night?
JN:  Well, we think that DC is seriously lacking in good Israeli pop music (by seriously lacking, we mean that there is none at all.)  So, we’re having an awesome Tel Avivdance party on U Street, to remind everyone of their fun nights out in Tel Aviv.  Our goal is both to put on an amazing party for everyone who wishes to experience Tel Aviv for a night, and at the same time to contribute the funds we earn to an Israeli organization that does meaningful and effective community service.

SR:  How is this related the previous “Yalla Yalla” party held in dc?
JN:  The first Yalla Yalla party back in November was a huge success, and we’re hoping that this second one will be the start of a continuing tradition. This party should offer the same vibe as the one in November — same location, same DC, same music, but this time we’re donating the proceeds to a different charity (Shalva, see below).  We’re hoping to continue these parties once or twice a year, bringing the Tel Aviv spirit to DC and helping some worthy organizations at the same time.

SR:  Do you feel likeyou’re cheating on Moshe I. by having this party without him?
JN:  Moshe cheated on us first by moving away!!  Just kidding — we have an open relationship with him, it’s cool.  But seriously, Moshe will definitely be there in spirit and hopes everyone has the best night ever.

SR:  What are you doing to add Israeli flavor to the party?
JN:  The music will be Israeli, the DJ is Israeli, we invited some of our Israeli friends, and the proceeds are all going to an Israeli community service organization.  It’s safe to say that everyone at the party has some connection to Israel.

SR:  What gives the three co-hosts Israeli street cred?
JN:  Well, Yoni is actually from the hood (Tel Aviv style), and he eats hummus by the spoonful, literally.  I (Jen) run on Israeli time, and Hillary just looks really Israeli.  But actually, all three of us are very connected to Israel and have spent a significant amount of time living there.

SR:  Will American Top 40 make an appearance? That’s how I get my dance on…
JN:  Of course!  They play American jams in Israel too!  It will be a perfect blend of Israeli and American top hits.

SR:  It says it’s $5 atthe door and all proceeds go to shalva.  That sounds good, but what’s Shalva?
JN:  Shalva is an amazing organization that offers individualized therapy to specials needs children in Israel, at no cost to the families. The therapies are tailored to each specific child, helping each one reach their full potential. To learn more visit Shalva.org.

Jewish Guy of the Week – Niv

So what makes you a special DC Jew? I wouldn’t say I’m any more special than other DC Jews; I actually have a lot in common with them. Many of my Jewish friends in the city are politically involved, have strong feelings about Israel (one way or another), have traveled and spent time abroad, and have some involvement with Jewish life. So I think I fit right in to that community.

Can you tell us about this “involvement with Jewish life?”
You know, occasional Moishe House dinners, meeting with my former colleagues from AIPAC, watching Kol Nidre on YouTube…  I guess working for a Jewish Magazine helps (Moment Magazine).

What’s the best piece you’ve ever written?  Link us to it.
Oh that’s tough. I think it might be a tie between a Washington Post “On Faith” piece about religious groups lobbying for progressive policies based on their faith, and an op-ed in the Christian Science Monitor about the use of mockery and humor in politics (it was right around the Jon Stewart rally).

I should also say that I’m really excited for my story on human rights coming up in the November issue of Moment.

Writing for a Jewish magazine — plumbing the depths of Judaism — has made you like Jews less or more?
Funny question!  Well, the truth is both. It’s reminded me how much depth there is to Judaism, and how interesting and thoughtful it can be. That said, the same themes keep coming up (as my lovely colleagues can attest), and at a certain point you sort of get over the excitement of discovering that some celebrity is Jewish or hearing the latest finding about the Holocaust. But I’m moving to Israel, so the Jewish thing is clearly not out of my system yet!

There are celebrities that are Jewish?!?!  Kidding.  I think the Daniel Radcliffe (Harry Potter) Jewish revelation is still my favorite.  Speaking of your Moment colleagues… why don’t you tell us a bit about Moment and some of its quirks.
Moment is a very special place. On the one hand, you could wear pajamas to work, but on the other hand you might be up all night at the office before a deadline. That makes for a lot of office bonding. Then you have random Jewish celebrities show up to say hi or get interviewed.  It’s pretty entertaining.

Which authors/columnists/poets have most inspired/formed your style of writing?
To be honest, I don’t think of myself as a writer. Writing is just the medium for exploring hidden truths or expounding discussions or revealing knowledge, which are the aspects of journalism that turn me on. Claiming inspiration from a writer would require me to acknowledge some set personal style, which I think I’m still developing.

Can you share any of the hidden truths you’ve found?
If I did they wouldn’t be hidden!  In my upcoming story, for example, I think that people’s politics very much color how they perceive current events and important trends, which reinforces their political views. It’s this interesting circular behavior.

What’s next?
I’m off to Tel Aviv!  I’ll be a breaking news editor for the Jerusalem Post, which I’m really excited about, and relishing the fact that I’ll be living in a city on the beach. I also have dear friends and relatives there, including my grandparents. (There’s one fun “interesting Jew” fact actually; my grandfather blew up the King David Hotel when it was a British military headquarters in mandatory Palestine.  How many people can claim that?)

Woah.  Amazing.  Is that why you’re in the States now?  Because your grandfather had to hightail it out of Israel following the incident?  What distinguishes this act from the acts of violence we see in Israel today?
On the contrary, he’s considered a hero, and still lives there with my grandmother. I think an important difference is that it was a military target, and they tried to avoid civilian casualty, but in many ways it is characteristic of the violence that has plagues the region for a century.

***Bemoan the departure of Niv at the next Moment Magazine happy hour on Tuesday, October 11 at Iron Horse.